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All That Jazz!

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File:younatj.nwc (May 2003) 17 kB
Full name of work:All That Jazz!
Composer:Young, Michael (1984 - ), Australian
Music category:Swing/Jazz
Instruments:Trumpets, Alto Saxophones, Tenor Saxophones, Trombone, Piano, Bass Guitar, Drums
Name of file creator:Michael Young
e-mail address:myoung11 "at" optusnet "dot" com "dot" au
Running time:00:06:41
Comments:A jazz chart written for a big-band style swing/jazz ensemble, "All That Jazz" is a rondo form piece that uses combinations of regular and irregular time signatures to recreate moods and feels of the music performed by the Dave Brubeck Quartet.

The A Section was written with the intention of recreating the 5/4 feel of "Take Five" which was written by saxophonist, Paul Desmond. The section prodominantly uses alto saxes to perform the melody, with the trombone and piano holding the harmony.

The B Section was written with the intention to imitate the 9/8 feel of "Blue Rondo a la Turk" as well as give myself the opportunity to expand further on Dave Brubeck's ideas by basing the section's piano, bass, drum and harmonies. In the section, trumpets and tenor saxes hold the melody, and the harmony is performed by the piano.

The C Section explores the concept of the early style blues (Circa 1900's). To create this mood. Melody and counter melody between the wind instruments,which is used to create the blues feel. As well as this, call and response is also used between the trumpets and alto saxes to create an echoing feel.There is also a written solo for alto sax 1 mid-way through the C Section.

The Coda section is essentially is a satire of the coda section of Calvin Cluster's arrangement of "Blue Rondo A La Turk". The way I did this was by taking coda apart, splitting the first for bars into groups of two, and a third group of four bars ( A1, A2 and A3), separating them by two bars 4/4 swing between A1 and A2, and separating A2 and A3 with two bars of 5/4 swing to create a rondo form ending. The piece then resolve from the 9/8 D minor to 4/4 F major to signify the completion of the piece.


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